THE SPARK BLOG

It’s the fourth and final part of our Christmas playlist, ‘The Twelve Plays of Christmas’. Christmas is only days away, Santa is readying his sleigh and lists of presents (demands?) are being ticked off.

Which means it is a good time to remember that Christmas can be about more than accumulating more ‘stuff’.

Greg Lake, ‘I Believe in Father Christmas’


‘And I believe in Father Christmas
And I looked to the sky with excited eyes
Till I woke with a yawn
In the first light of dawn
And I saw him and through his disguise’

What age were you when you stopped believing in Santa?  Was it a shock or the conclusion of a long-held suspicion? For ‘grown-up’ kids a more pressing question might be: how do I comfort my child when they find out the truth about Santa?

Some people suggest that finding out the truth about Santa can be turned into a positive experience for a child.  Instead of being distraught at the loss of a much-loved fantasy, your child could be encouraged to view the experience as an important part of growing up.

They are no longer just a receiver of presents from Santa. Now they are part of a centuries-old quest to keep the magic alive for younger siblings, cousins and friends. Furthermore, it represents a perfect opportunity to encourage older kids to consider being less self-centered and a little more interested in the needs and happiness of others. This is especially important in the lead up to a season that has become – in the western world at least – synonymous with selfish excess.

The singer of ‘I Believe in Father Christmas’, Greg Lake, was part of a 70s prog-rock ban Emerson, Lake and Palmer that were noted for their excess.

Keith Emerson stood behind an array of keyboard instruments while Carl Palmer was known for his lengthy drum solos and the size of his drum kit.  You might think that Greg Lake as bass player had little opportunity to be grandiose but he made up for it by purchasing expensive Persian carpets to stand on when he was on stage.

If you are breaking the truth about Santa to your child this Christmas, be gentle but also consider using it as a way to explain why no one really needs an expensive Persian rug or this year’s ‘must-have’ toy.

Mud, ‘Lonely this Christmas’


Christmas is all about friends and family, right?  When you think about Christmas you probably picture an endless whirl of social gatherings, office parties and family get-togethers that start in early December and end on January 2nd.  This is the reality for many of us but loneliness at Christmas is sadly also a fact-of-life for many people.

Loneliness has reached epidemic proportions in the UK, particularly amongst older people.  According to Age UK, two-fifths of all older people (about 3.9 million) say the television is their main company. For those of us lucky enough to have companionship at home, in work, in study or with friends it is hard to comprehend.

Little changes can, however, make a huge difference. For example, instead of stuffing a Christmas card through your neighbour’s letterbox and trying to slip away unnoticed, ring the doorbell and have a chat. Visit your elderly neighbour or aunt/uncle instead of staying in the house and watching yet another Christmas movie on Netflix.

Even when it might feel like you don’t have the time or inclination, you can be sure that your efforts will be appreciated.

A little bit of trivia for ‘Lonely this Christmas’ is that Les Gray’s vocals are so reminiscent of Elvis Presley that there is a version of the record on YouTube, attributed to Presley, that has received 11.5m views.  Believe us, despite releasing a whole album full of Christmas songs, Elvis never sang ‘Lonely this Christmas’ (apologies if that news, combined with confirmation that there is no Santa, has come as a terrible shock!).

Celine Dion, ‘Don’t Save It All for Christmas Day’


Christmas wouldn’t be Christmas without a power ballad.  While Maria Carey’s ‘All I Want For Christmas’ is said to be the best-selling modern Christmas song of all time, we prefer ‘Don’t Save It All for Christmas Day’ by fellow diva, Celine Dion.

This song has a very simple message: if you can spread good feelings at Christmas then why not try doing it all year round.

We are often encouraged or taught to believe that Christmas is about ‘peace and goodwill to all’ and to focus on giving as much as receiving. Despite the best efforts of retailers, this is supposed to be a time for putting aside selfish interests and spending time considering the needs of others.

Allegedly, one year Carey was asked to turn on the Christmas lights at Westfield Mall in Los Angeles.  Apparently, she agreed to do it but only if 20 white kittens and 100 white doves were released as part of the event!

While such behaviour might be synonymous with Ms Carey, it is the polar opposite of the true meaning of Christmas. Spreading peace and goodwill is what we should try to get back to this Christmas and for that matter, every day of the year.

As Dion sings:
‘Don’t save it all for Christmas Day
Find a way
To give a little love every day’.

#12PlaysofChristmas

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